Six schemes for encoding the words "United States" via telegraphic messaging. Source: H. Nyquist, “Certain factors affecting telegraph speed,” Bell Syst. Tech. J., Apr. 1924, p. 338.

 

Bernard Dionysius Geoghegan is a media theorist and historian of technology with a particular interest in how digital media—as ensembles of practice, instrument, and inscription—interweave with science, aesthetics, and the environment to form cultural technologies. Currently a senior lecturer in Media & Communications at Coventry, in autumn 2017 he will serve as visiting associate professor of Film & Media Studies at Yale University and in January 2017 he will join King's College London as a senior lecturer in the Department of Digital Humanities. Bernard's work rests on a conception of digital technologies as transmedial and as formed through an ongoing composition of living bodies, platforms, and writing systems into hybrid assemblages. His book manuscript From Information Theory to French Theory (under review) examines how scientific and political strategies shaped the incorporation of digital epistemologies into the humanities and social sciences between 1930 and 1970, particularly in structuralist and poststructuralist theories. He is currently writing a book with Francesco Casetti on screening as a cultural technique that examines the history of managing environments and space through screen-based media technologies such as radar and global positioning systems. This book project intersects with his work as a curator for the Anthropocene and Technosphere projects at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin, Germany. His website is www.bernardg.com. He may be found online at Twitter, iTunes, or Google+ and reached by email at bernard@u.northwestern.edu. His CV is available here